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ABC: All Barack – All the Time

September 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog Entries

The Obama healthcare infomercial scheduled to air tonight on ABC (All Barack Channel) is on the minds of a lot of folks and for good reason. The fact that ABC is not allowing any opposition opinion or coverage is just one more indication that the tentacles of state controlled enterprise – in the media, car business, insurance, banking and elsewhere – are extending further and further everyday.

While the temptation to tune in and watch this spectacle may be great – driven primarily by curiosity – I think the best thing concerned citizens can do is tune out. By watching this broadcast you’ll be helping to improve ABC’s ratings which they will then report as a rousing success and a complete buy-in by the American public. They will then use this as a propaganda tool to help buttress the Obama healthcare plan. This will ultimately even improve their bottom line by presenting stronger ratings to potential advertisers.

I’m not buying it, and they shouldn’t be selling it.

Mums the Word on Iran

September 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog Entries

I’m a bit of a history buff – but not a historian. That is to say while I love to read and study history, occasionally I get my dates confused and sometimes speak in general terms as they apply to specific historic events. However, I do vividly remember the late 1970s, the early days of the “Islamic Revolution”, and the blatant non-response to an attack on what is considered by international law sovereign U.S. soil – a critical event that forever changed the geopolitical landscape in the Middle East and around the globe.
I was only in the seventh grade when all this took place, but I do recall the outrage of our nation as we viewed the televised images of our accosted countrymen and women held hostage for 444 days with only an impotent response, at best, from a President who evidently placed little value on our national sovereignty.

Since then, I have read several historical accounts of the Islamic Revolution and feel like I have a pretty good handle on the events that precipitated the 1979 seizure of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and the ensuing hostage crisis.

What I think our leadership today appears to be overlooking is the fact that 30 years removed from those historic events, the very people who implemented the Islamic Revolution – radical, extremist mullahs and their followers under the direction of the Ayatollah Khomeini – are the very people now “governing” Iran, a rogue nation and state sponsor of international terror on the cusp of nuclear capability.

The regime currently wielding power in Iran is harshly suppressing the rights of its citizens, silencing their dissent in a manner reminiscent of Tienanmen Square in 1989. At the very least, I would expect a modicum of disapproval verbalized by the administration, but thus far the White House has been virtually mum on this issue that has even the president of France (among other historically liberal European leaders) expressing condemnation. This apparent lack of moral indignation is cause for concern.
All that to say this: I think the citizens of our own country are as hungry for genuine leadership as citizens of other nations around the world are for liberty and freedom, evidenced by the unfolding events in Iran.

It seems apparent that our President and his administration have no intention of addressing this potential crisis in the making in a meaningful way. That responsibility then falls to our elected officials in Congress. I wonder how much longer we’ll have to wait for someone in Washington to take an official position.

30 years is long enough.

Patriotism: The Cowboy Way

September 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog Entries

What could be more American than being a cowboy? I had the opportunity as a teenager (and a young adult) to live the dream of being a cowboy, and that way of life is still a big part of who I am today.
Some years back, I wrote a patriotic monologue that I think captures the cowboy way of life and embodies the true spirit of America. This was my signature presentation as a rodeo announcer, and no matter where I recited it – from Minnesota to Florida – it never failed to evoke an emotional, patriotic response and a rousing ovation as “Old Glory” made her pass in true cowboy (or cowgirl) fashion. Take a listen.


That’s my beautiful wife Stacy presenting “Old Glory” at a bullriding event in Rochester, Minnesota.

While I’m certainly proud to have been a cowboy (once a cowboy, always a cowboy), my abiding love of our country is the driving force behind my motivation to serve, as I did in the military, and as I now seek elected office. Your support in that endeavor is graciously and sincerely appreciated.

True Faith and Allegiance

September 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog Entries

I remember well the day I took the oath of enlistment – January 2, 1985. On that day I solemnly swore to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.”

This oath is very similar to the oath that military officers take to which he/she solemnly swears (or affirms) that he/she will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic, that he/she will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that he/she takes this obligation freely, without any mental reservations or purpose of evasion; and that he/she will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God.

The oath of office above is virtually identical to the oath of office taken by Senators, Congressmen and Congresswomen, as well the President of the United States. In each case, the individual swears to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic, that he/she will bear true faith and allegiance to the same. Again, very similar to the oath of enlistment.

However, note the responsibilities the enlisted service member is charged to uphold in addition to supporting and defending the Constitution of the United States. The enlisted man or woman swears to obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over him/her, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

What that means to me is that we are to rely on the sound judgment of those officers above us – military, Congressional, or Executive – to discern right from wrong and communicate that to their subordinates.

Notice that the oath of office, versus the oath of enlistment, does not prescribe obedience to the President of the United States, but does require the officer or officeholder to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic, and to bear true faith and allegiance to the same.”

Implicit in this oath is that the officer (or office holder) should discern those orders which would be morally questionable or would put the Constitution of the United States in peril. By deliberately obeying an order that is morally questionable or would put the Constitution of the United States in peril, the officer is not bearing true faith and allegiance to the Constitution of the United States.

All that to say this: I believe the Constitution is in peril and we need officers – office holders – who “will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.” We need leadership that we can trust to discern right from wrong, communicate that to those they represent, and stand for the right – whether it’s popular or not, politically correct or incorrect.

The day I entered the U.S. Army – January 2, 1985 – I swore an oath to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.”

My oath has no expiration date.

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